Nimble: Love that Revolutionary Leadership!

It’s finally happening!

A hosted fun, friendly Social Customer Relationship Management solution that a small business  can actually afford.  For those who just came into this virtual room, a quick note to explain SCRM. It’s not simply adding FaceBook, LinkedIn or other social networking services to traditional Customer Relationship Management.

In her February 23 blog, Ann All says that

In perhaps the best definition of SCRM I’ve seen yet,  [Bertrand] Duperrin  says SCRM shifts the focus from the “management” aspect of CRM to the “relationship” aspect….As Duperrin writes, it’s “moving from ‘buy my product, it’s the best’ to ‘How can I help you.’” And follow-up gets more emphasis in SCRM, sometimes with a dedicated customer care channel on social media or a “peer care” platform where customers can help each other.

So why am I so excited about the rollout of Nimble Contact? Back on April 11, 2009,   I had reported the results of my advocacy that GoldMine from FrontRange stop ignoring the reality of social networking as it applies to business development. And that FrontRange should begin development along those lines. The result?  Comments from well-known FrontRange GoldMine partner technical “experts” who said things like ” I don’t see how social networking fits into the realm of GoldMine. ” A recent Tweet from FrontRange indicated the company had just joined a LinkedIn cloud computing community.

Fast forward to February 2010. Who contacted us to let us know he had started the Nimble Contact revolution? None other than Jon Ferrara, who also had inspired and led the development of  the original GoldMine customer relationship management product that many small businesses had invested in.  We signed up for the Nimble Contact beta testing and development, and have been following the progress of Nimble Contact for a full year now.  By the time you read this blog, Nimble Contacta software solution for businesses that have chosen applications in the cloudwill have been rolled out.  Here is the demo Ferrera gave today.

Usually, you see the picture of the watchful eye at the end of my blogs. Today, I am happy to say that we are partnering with Nimble, and you will now see the Nimble logo not only here but also on our Nimble Partner Website and on our Pequod Systems website as well.


Welcome, Nimble Contact !

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Communication, Leadership and Revolution 2.0 Style

Like a lot of others, I have been transfixed by the short and comparatively peaceful revolutionary events in Egypt. Like a lot of others, I am now watching reports about similar demonstrations Algeria and Yemen. I have been reminded of a prediction by my computing mentor David Rorabaugh,  who—back in the days of Windows 3.1—had predicted whole online communities communicating with each other around common concerns and interests. Dave was right. An attempted Soviet coup in 1991 had failed in part because of the role that the Internet had played in communicating the truth of what was happening.

And Dave is right about another observation he made recently, namely how the Internet supports democratization by by shining a light on those who try to shut down that most precious gift of communication around the globe. His perspective on the history of revolution: “There was an actual wave of that in eastern Europe as the [Berlin] wall fell [in November 1989]. Backpackers with telco wireless gear lighting up unrest across Albania, among other places. Between then and now, the infrastructure has advanced to the point that guerrilla networking is only necessary when the government attempts to interfere. ”

Wael Ghonim—the Google executive who was held by Egyptian authorities for almost two weeks during the protests in Egypt—coordinated activities from within his walk-up apartment. In his 60 Minutes interview, he thanked the Mubarak government for being “so stupid.” In a word, so naive. That naiveté, when combined with fear of transparency, brought down the Mubarek government.

I am left thinking about Nikhil Sheth, a far less-known friend in India who is working to bring about a different kind of revolution.   Ever since its founding in 1924, Toastmasters International—an organization of about 12,500 clubs and more than 260,000 members in 113 countries—has insisted upon recognizing only those meetings which are conducted face to face. Nikhil is a Toastmaster who understands the role of technology to advance communication beyond the borders of local traditional Toastmasters International club meetings. Recognizing that many professionals today need to learn teleconference skills and group communication skills over the Internet, Nikhil and an enthusiastic group are planning a pilot Internet meeting later this month. He is advocating for technology—the very course that my mentor David Rorabaugh counseled years ago.

A small group of Toastmasters meeting over the Internet will hardly have the same impact as the events of 1989, 1991 or Egypt in February 2011. But it is a start.

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“Managed Services” and “Pre-Care” Duke it Out!

Susan Ellsworth

There is nothing quite so special as constructive feedback from a former customer—-a successful business person in his own right who we regard as a real friend we have known for well over a dozen years. A friend who, having built one company, has moved on to build another one in a completely different line of business.

Recently Dave called me just as a friend and asked if I were open to hearing some feedback about a recent eMail I had sent out. Feedback is a gift, so of course I was interested!

Long story short, my last eMail had two problems. First, it was too long. Second, it’s the word “Managed Services.” For some people, it’s an intimidating, long phrase without a lot of meaning. He suggested a shorter word that describes what we do: PreCare

 Here is one way to consider what we do: Instead of our manually checking servers and workstations for routine maintenance like drive space, software licensing, hardware configuration, performance issues, and so on, these and other checks are automated. Alerts to let us know when there’s a real problem. This process frees us up to focus more on our clients’ needs, and to work on projects which help them grow while saving money. 

So what do YOU think? “Managed Services” or “Pre-Care” ? Your comments are welcome.

Watching 24 x 7 x 365

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